Concrete Deterioration

Concrete Deterioration Long, Wide or Deep Cracks

Cracking is common on concrete surfaces, such as concrete driveways. Cracks can occur as the concrete surface begins to settle or due to the expansion and contraction of the concrete due to weather extremes. Small cracks can be sealed or filled in. However, cracks that are long, wide, or deep cannot be repaired.

Concrete Deterioration Sunken Concrete

The second sign that it is time to replace your concrete driveway is when portions of your driveway are sinking. Sinking concrete is most commonly caused by drainage issues.

Your driveway is sloped so that water from rain or sprinklers falls down the slope and into the gutter or the street. But when there are cracks, pits, potholes, or improper grading, water may not drain away from the concrete. Instead, it may sink through to the foundation of the concrete, causing the foundation to erode away. When this occurs, your concrete surface may sink. When the concrete is sinking, products can be injected below the surface to help lift the concrete. But they are pricy and don’t always work. If your concrete surface is older or in poor condition, replacing the surface makes more sense.

How do you keep concrete from deteriorating?

The other option is that the sulfate salts will cause the cement paste to dissolve, soften, and ultimately erode. Prevent this type of deterioration by testing the sulfate content of the water and soil, and then creating a resistant concrete mix by limiting the water to cement ratio

What causes deterioration of concrete?

  • CORROSION OF EMBEDDED METALS. Corrosion of reinforcing steel and other embedded metals is the leading cause of deterioration in concrete. …
  • FREEZE-THAW DETERIORATION. When water freezes, it expands about 9%. …
  • CHEMICAL ATTACK. …
  • ALKALI-AGGREGATE REACTIVITY. …
  • ABRASION/EROSION. …
  • FIRE/HEAT. …
  • RESTRAINT TO VOLUME CHANGES.

 

 

 

What are the 5 structural problems of concrete?

The following information covers common concrete problems and the solutions that can preserve your structure’s appearance and stability.
  • Discoloration. …
  • Cracks. …
  • Scaling. …
  • Crazing. …
  • Buckling.

 

What are the defects of concrete?

Various types of defects which can be observed in hardened concrete surface and their prevention methods are explained below:
  • Cracking. …
  • Crazing. …
  • Blistering. …
  • Delamination. …
  • Dusting. …
  • Curling. …
  • Efflorescence. …
  • Scaling and Spalling.

 

Concrete Deterioration Pitting or Potholes

The last sign that is indicative of a failing concrete driveway is pitting or potholes. There are a number of reasons why pitting or potholes may be present on the surface of a concrete driveway. Hail storms may have caused damage, heavy cars or trucks may have been parked on the driveway, deicing salt may have eaten away at the concrete, or the concrete may be naturally deteriorating due to the aging process. Pitting and potholes create numerous problems for your concrete surface. The small or large holes allow water to sit and puddle on the concrete surface. Pits and potholes also absorb water, which can affect the foundation below the concrete surface, causing your asphalt surface to sink or crumble away.

Concrete Deterioration hire the pros

When your concrete driveway, patio, sidewalk, steps are displaying one or more of these signs, it is time to replace it. If you are in the Flint concrete would love to help you remove your old driveway and pour a new one.  Flint Concrete can transform a deteriorated concrete surface into a durable, lasting driveway, sidewalk and patio. Call (855) 719-1222

Service Brochure

Construction-Brochure-Sample

An overview of our construction services from Construction Management, Design-build, General Contracting to Small Jobs and Service Work

Service-Brochure.PDF

Ready to upgrade your home?

Get An Inspection & Estimate From A Fully Licensed & Insured Professional
Today. Call Today! (855) 719-1222

Proudly Servicing

Alabama • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • Florida • Georgia • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming